Tales of Torment: Death, Nature, and Genre in Keri Hulme’s Short Story Collection Te Kaihau/The Windeater

  • Justine Seran University of Edinburgh

Abstract


This article engages in close reading of New Zealand Maori writer Keri Hulme's 1986 short fiction collection. It explores how she borrows from Western literary genres to create a syncretic literature of unease and build a universe where death and destruction are linked to an imbalance in the natural world.

Author Information

Justine Seran, University of Edinburgh
Justine Seran is a first-year PhD candidate at the University of Edinburgh. Her thesis explores the links between aesthetics and politics in contemporary indigenous women's writing of Australia and New Zealand. Wider research interests include postcolonial criticism, indigenous studies and black feminism, as well as the development of online learning and techno-pedagogy.
Published
05-Jun-2013
How to Cite
Seran, J. (2013, June 5). Tales of Torment: Death, Nature, and Genre in Keri Hulme’s Short Story Collection Te Kaihau/The Windeater. FORUM: University of Edinburgh Postgraduate Journal of Culture & The Arts, (16), 1 - 13. Retrieved from http://www.forumjournal.org/article/view/523